Friday, April 27, 2018

Aniue, Aneue, Chichiue, Hahaue 兄上, 姉上, 父上, 母上

In Japanese, the words aniue, aneue, chichiue, and hahaue mean "older brother," "older sister," "father," and "mother," respectively, the same thing as ani, ane, chichi and haha. However, the words with the __ue pattern have a different nuance.

Ane 姉

The word ane means "older sister" in Japanese. It's somewhat synonymous with oneesan お姉さん, but differs in usage. (see ane vs. oneesan). The "older brother" counterpart would be ani, while imouto is "younger sister."

Ani 兄

The word ani means "older brother" in Japanese. It's somewhat synonymous with oniisan お兄さん, but differs in usage. (see ani vs. oniisan). The "older sister" counterpart would be ane, while otouto is "younger brother."

Haha 母

The word haha means "mother" in Japanese (or it's a laugh, haha). It's somewhat synonymous with okaasan お母さん, but differs in usage. (see haha vs. okaasan). The "father" counterpart would be chichi.

Chichi 父

The word chichi means "father" in Japanese (or "breasts," see: oppai おっぱい). It's somewhat synonymous with otousan お父さん, but differs in usage. (see chichi vs. otousan). The "mother" counterpart would be haha.

Aneki 姉貴

In Japanese, the word aneki means "older sister," just like oneesan お姉さん, although sometimes it can be used to refer to an older woman who's not really the speaker's sister, but whom they respect.
Thursday, April 26, 2018

Aniki 兄貴

In Japanese, aniki is a way to refer to someone's "older brother," just like oniisan お兄さん, but it's often used in other ways, like to refer to someone whom the speaker consider to be his big bro, or to one's senior in a gang.

Ossan おっさん

The word ossan means "old man" in Japanese, sometimes translated as "middle-aged man" instead. It's considered to be a relaxed, casual word, and it can either be taken as a cozy way to say "old man" or as a rude way to say "old man." Sometimes it can be used as a derogatory.
Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Oyaji オヤジ, 親父, 親仁, 親爺

The word oyaji means "father" in Japanese, making it synonymous with otousan, but sometimes it can refer to a man of certain age, similar to how the word ojisan works, or the owner of a shop instead
Monday, April 23, 2018

Obaasan お祖母さん, お婆さん

The word obaasan means "grandmother" in Japanese. (but sometimes refers to an elder woman). It's also romanized obāsan, with a macron. Not to be confused with obasan without a macron, which means "aunt" instead.

It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama. (see obaachan vs. obaasan vs. obaasama)

Ojiisan お祖父さん, お爺さん

The word ojiisan means "grandfather" in Japanese. (but sometimes refers to an elder man). It's also romanized ojīsan, with a macron. Not to be confused with ojisan without a macron, which means "uncle" instead.

It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama. (see ojiichan vs. ojiisan vs. ojiisama)

Obasan おばさん, 伯母さん, 叔母さん, 小母さん

The word obasan means "aunt" or in Japanese (but sometimes refers to an older woman). Not to be confused with obaasan or obāsan with a macron, which mean "grandmother" instead.

It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama. (see obachan vs. obasan vs. obasama)

Ojisan おじさん, 伯父さん, 叔父さん, 小父さん

The word ojisan means "uncle" in Japanese (but sometimes refers to an older man). Not to be confused with ojiisan or ojīsan with a macron, which mean "grandfather" instead.

It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama. (see ojichan vs. ojisan vs. ojisama)
Saturday, April 21, 2018

Musume 娘

The word musume 娘 means "daughter" in Japanese, most of the time. In some cases it simply refers to a girl or girls.

Musuko 息子

The word musuko means "son" in Japanese, most of the time.
Friday, April 20, 2018

Imouto 妹

The word imouto means "younger sister" in Japanese. Sometimes it's translated as "little sister" instead, but it's "younger sister." Even if your younger sister is bigger than you she's still your imouto.

Otouto 弟

The word otouto means "younger brother" in Japanese. Sometimes it's translated as "little brother" instead, but it's "younger brother." Even if your younger brother is bigger than you he's still your otouto.

Oneesan お姉さん

The word oneesan means "older sister" in Japanese (but sometimes refers to a young woman). It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama. (see oneechan vs. oneesan vs. oneesama)

Oniisan お兄さん

The word oniisan means "older brother" in Japanese (but sometimes refers to a young man). It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama. (see oniichan vs. oniisan vs. oniisama)
Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Okaasan お母さん

The word okaasan means "mother" in Japanese (and sometimes refers to one's wife). It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama.

Otousan お父さん

The word otousan means "father" in Japanese (and sometimes refers to one's husband). It's one of the many family words with the o__san お〇〇さん pattern, and as such the honorific suffix can be changed between san, chan and sama.
Friday, April 13, 2018

Family Members in Japanese - List of Words

For reference, a list of words for family members in Japanese.
Sunday, April 8, 2018

Tarou, Ichirou, Jirou, Saburou, Shirou 太郎, 一郎, 次郎, 三郎, 四郎

If you've watched a lot of anime, chances are you've come across a character or another with a name like this: Tarou 太郎, Ichirou 一郎, Jirou 次郎, Saburou 三郎, Shirou 四郎, or that ends with that. These names all end in rou 郎. The question is: what's the meaning this naming pattern?

Well, it's a Japanese custom called haikoumei 輩行名, in which sons, only sons, male children, are named according to their birth order. An interesting thing of this practice is that you can tell whether a character has an older brother or not from his name.
Sunday, April 1, 2018

Bokukko & Other Types of -kko Girls in Anime ~っ娘

In Japanese, a word for an attribute plus the the suffix kko っ娘, kko っ子, or kko っこ, can be used to refer to an anime (or real life) girl (or guy) that possesses said attribute. In this post I'll list some examples.